Some Factors Have A Greater Impact On Heart Attack Risk In Women Than They Do In Men

Heart Disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. While there are some risk factors that you can't control, there are many things you can do to prevent becoming a statistic. Willis Knighton has implemented a new program called the Ornish Lifestyle Medicine. It's a non-invasive approach designed to restore quality of life in some of the most critical heart patients.

I went In-Depth to learn more about the program and how it works. I talked to 4 people who went through the program together, Sharena Estes, John Bandell, Ken ? who all suffered a sudden heart attack, and Janie Conerly who had 90% blockage.

They were perfect strangers united by a common - potentially fatal medical condition - heart disease.

Dr. Eddie Johnson oversees a portion of Willis Knighton's Cardiac rehabilitation, "I see people who have had all of the surgeries, and the stents and the procedures done and they don't want to look at something like heart transplant."

Janie says, when John first started, he kinda drug into the fitness center, "He was kinda of weak and couldn't do to much but it wasn't long before he was dancing at the VFW on Saturday nights."

John, Janie, Ken and Sharena are the first graduates of the Ornish Lifestyle Medicine program at Willis Knighton Health and Fitness Center, a four-pronged approach to improve their overall condition and heart health.

Janie, who's 68 years old says, "I feel 100% better and my numbers are good. I already had my blood work, my cholesterol is down, my LDL is down and my A1C was 5." As for 79 year old John, "I'm eating right and I'm exercising at least 3 times a week instead of sitting in my chair."

Dr. Johnson enjoys seeing the results, "In just about everybody there's improved energy, and improved ability to do their everyday activities."

Dr. Johnson describes the Ornish program as Enhanced Cardiac Rehab. "They're here 3 times a week for four hours, as opposed to the ordinary rehab that's here for 1 hour 3 days a week but it gives them a little more impact in staying with the program when you have all of those things included."

With the Ornish Program the emphasis is not just on exercise but stress management, community and diet are also important.

This group started the 9 week program in August. They continue to get together because it's become a part of their lifestyle.

They come Tuesday mornings about 9:30, visit for a few minutes, exercise, then we go find somewhere to eat.

70 year old Sharena admits she likes the accountability. And adds, the Ornish Program has helped her learn to eat better.

"Overall I've lost almost 90 pounds. But, since I started the program I lost an additional 25. So I had already lost weight but this helped me loose additional weight."

As for 69 year old Ken, he's become the group's food researcher, "Within 2 weeks I started feeling different and better and I've enjoyed it."

The group says Ken goes all over town hunting us a place to eat, looking for restaurants where they can maintain an Ornish style - whole food and plant based diet. "It's is overwhelming when you first start because you've been raised to eat meat and set your meal around your meat. But, once you learn how to do it, and the program helps you."

Jared Mitchell is the Ornish program director. From Yoga for stress management - to exercise.

Experts say the lifestyle program developed by Dr. Dean Ornish is scientifically proven to make a difference even reversing the development of plaque than can lead to heart disease. "One patient that finished reported feeling so much better energy wise, she's lost a lot of weight, and even her doctor told me he's excited he got her into this program because she has her life back."

Dr. Johnson adds, "It's like any support really, this gives them the support for things that are going to keep them alive."

The program requires a doctors referral. Willis Knighton in Shreveport is the only location in the state to offer the Ornish-Certified program.

More ArkLaTex In-Depth Stories

>
> +2 Heart patients find hope in a program that may reverse heart disease

Heart patients find hope in a program that may reverse heart disease

Heart Disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. While there are some risk factors that you can't control, there are many things you can do to prevent becoming a statistic.  Read more

> +3 Follow these tips to ensure furnace safety this winter

Follow these tips to ensure furnace safety this winter

  • Neil Shaw

The cold weather should serve as a reminder to check your furnace, because a little prevention can keep you from having problems – even a life-threatening emergency – this winter. Read more

> +5 Ghost hunters chase paranormal prey in Texarkana

Ghost hunters chase paranormal prey in Texarkana

  • Brian Fowler

These days you can see ghosts every day – from YouTube videos to reality TV shows where eyewitnesses tell their own ghost stories. Read more

House fires on the rise during recent cold snap>

House fires on the rise during recent cold snap

It's a time for Christmas displays and twinkling lights, but for hundreds of ArkLaTex families - these are the lights they'll see gleaming in the chilly air this holiday season. Read more

Willis-Knighton - One year after a coup attempt>

Willis-Knighton - One year after a coup attempt

  • Jamie Ostroff

In the fall of 2017, a group of top doctors at Willis-Knighton Health System tried to oust the healthcare giant’s longtime CEO, saying his inflexibility in an increasingly competitive and rapidly changing medical industry had become too big a liability. Read more

Source : https://www.ktbs.com/news/arklatex-indepth/heart-patients-find-hope-in-a-program-that-may-reverse/article_18bbfa76-fcba-11e8-bcfe-6bbdcb652278.html

Heart patients find hope in a program that may reverse heart disease
Healthy? Stay fit to avoid a heart attack
High blood pressure, smoking raise heart attack risk more in women, study says
Why Your Heart Disease Risk Might Be Lower Than You Think
Have You Heard of These 5 Heart Attack Risk Factors?
Women, Blacks Hit Harder by Heart Disease Risk Factors
Smoking, diabetes and hypertension spike heart attack risk in women
In Qatar, diabetes is high risk factor for heart attack and stroke
High blood pressure, smoking raise heart attack risk more in women, study says
Women or Men — Who Has a Higher Risk of Heart Attack?