What You Need To Know As The U.S. Government Shutdown Nears A Record

President Trump thanked furloughed federal workers for their devotion during the shutdown and credited them with helping to make America great again. USA TODAY

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WASHINGTON – The president announced a deal on Friday to temporarily end to the longest-ever government shutdown, teeing up three weeks of negotiations to end the stalemate over funding for a wall along the southern border. 

Trump, speaking from the White House, said the temporary relief would allow the 800,000 federal employees who haven't been paid to receive back pay and catch up on their bills. 

"We have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government," he said. 

But, the deal is temporary and has an expiration date: Feb. 15.

Here's what you should know about the deal and what comes next: 

Shutdown expected to end today

Both the Senate and House passed a bill to reopen the government Friday after Trump gave his speech and approved the temporary solution.

The measure was sent to the White House for the president's approval Friday night.  

Trump said he would sign the measure and called for a showing of bipartisanship to put a final end to the impasse over funding for a border wall. 

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Trump addresses the nation as passengers watch, or don't watch, his speech at Central terminal B. Staffing issues related to the government slowdown caused delays at New York's LaGuardia Airport
Trump addresses the nation as passengers watch, or don't watch, his speech at Central terminal B. Staffing issues related to the government slowdown caused delays at New York's LaGuardia Airport Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY>FullscreenPresident Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, to announce a temporary deal to open the government.
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, to announce a temporary deal to open the government. Susan Walsh, AP>FullscreenNational security adviser John Bolton, left, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, second from left, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second from right, and Vice President Mike Pence, right, listen as President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, to announce a temporary deal to open the government.
National security adviser John Bolton, left, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, second from left, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second from right, and Vice President Mike Pence, right, listen as President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, to announce a temporary deal to open the government. Susan Walsh, AP>FullscreenReporters listen to the address of President Donald J. Trump near the Senate chamber, as Trump agreed to end the partial government shutdown, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Jan. 25, 2019. Trump and Congress agreed to a continuing resolution to fund the federal government on the 35th day of the shutdown.
Reporters listen to the address of President Donald J. Trump near the Senate chamber, as Trump agreed to end the partial government shutdown, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Jan. 25, 2019. Trump and Congress agreed to a continuing resolution to fund the federal government on the 35th day of the shutdown. Erik S. Lesser, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to reporters as he walks out of the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, after President Donald Trump says a deal has been made to reopen the government for three weeks.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to reporters as he walks out of the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, after President Donald Trump says a deal has been made to reopen the government for three weeks. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenA passenger gets help at Central terminal B security check-in. Staffing issues related to the government slowdown caused delays at New York's LaGuardia Airport .
A passenger gets help at Central terminal B security check-in. Staffing issues related to the government slowdown caused delays at New York's LaGuardia Airport . Robert Deutsch, USA TODAY>FullscreenDemocratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy, center, walks near the Senate chamber before President Donald J. Trump agreed to end the partial government shutdown, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Jan. 25, 2019.
Democratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy, center, walks near the Senate chamber before President Donald J. Trump agreed to end the partial government shutdown, at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Jan. 25, 2019. Erik S. Lesser, EPA-EFE>FullscreenFederal furloughed employees line up to receive free lunch at the World Central Kitchen in Washington on Jan. 25, 2019. Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser, with chef Jose Andres, founder of World Central Kitchen, and chef Spike Mendelsohn hand out meals to federal furloughed employees in need.
Federal furloughed employees line up to receive free lunch at the World Central Kitchen in Washington on Jan. 25, 2019. Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser, with chef Jose Andres, founder of World Central Kitchen, and chef Spike Mendelsohn hand out meals to federal furloughed employees in need. Shawn Thew, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, speaks to reporters as she walks into a closed-door meeting with Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019.
Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, speaks to reporters as she walks into a closed-door meeting with Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenTravelers checking in for their flight at Newark Airport. Some traveller experienced the effects of the Federal shutdown while traveling in and out of the airport in Newark, Friday Jan. 25, 2019.
Travelers checking in for their flight at Newark Airport. Some traveller experienced the effects of the Federal shutdown while traveling in and out of the airport in Newark, Friday Jan. 25, 2019. Tariq Zehawi, NorthJersey.com-USA TODAY NETWORK>FullscreenA protestor holds a placard stating "STOP THE SHUTDOWN" while demonstrating with Philadelphia Airport TSA and airport workers outside the Philadelphia International Airport on Jan. 25, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
A protestor holds a placard stating "STOP THE SHUTDOWN" while demonstrating with Philadelphia Airport TSA and airport workers outside the Philadelphia International Airport on Jan. 25, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mark Makela, Getty Images>FullscreenA protester holds a placard while demonstrating with Philadelphia Airport TSA and airport workers outside the Philadelphia International Airport on Jan. 25, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pa.
A protester holds a placard while demonstrating with Philadelphia Airport TSA and airport workers outside the Philadelphia International Airport on Jan. 25, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pa. Mark Makela, Getty Images>FullscreenA TSA worker smiles as he checks travelers' boarding passes and identification, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. Yielding to mounting pressure and growing disruption, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders on Friday reached a short-term deal to reopen the government for three weeks while negotiations continue over the president's demands for money to build his long-promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border.
A TSA worker smiles as he checks travelers' boarding passes and identification, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. Yielding to mounting pressure and growing disruption, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders on Friday reached a short-term deal to reopen the government for three weeks while negotiations continue over the president's demands for money to build his long-promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. Ted S. Warren, AP>FullscreenHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks to members of the media as she arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks to members of the media as she arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenThe Capitol is seen under dark skies at sunset after the Senate rejected competing Democratic and Republican proposals for ending the partial government shutdown, which is the longest in the nation's history, in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019.
The Capitol is seen under dark skies at sunset after the Senate rejected competing Democratic and Republican proposals for ending the partial government shutdown, which is the longest in the nation's history, in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite, AP>FullscreenPresident Donald J. Trump  delivers remarks to members of the news media beside Republican lawmakers, during a meeting on trade in the Cabinet Room of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 24, 2019. Trump used the opportunity to speak on his border security policy, the ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government and trade duties.
President Donald J. Trump delivers remarks to members of the news media beside Republican lawmakers, during a meeting on trade in the Cabinet Room of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 24, 2019. Trump used the opportunity to speak on his border security policy, the ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government and trade duties. Michael Reynolds, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSenator Mitt Romney (R-Utah) talking to the media following the Senate rejecting a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history.
Senator Mitt Romney (R-Utah) talking to the media following the Senate rejecting a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>FullscreenRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) talks to the media as she and other House Democrat members leave the Senate Chambers after the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) talks to the media as she and other House Democrat members leave the Senate Chambers after the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>FullscreenRep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) and other House Democrat members walking from the Senate Chambers after the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history.
Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) and other House Democrat members walking from the Senate Chambers after the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) departs the Senate Chamber.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) departs the Senate Chamber. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>FullscreenSenator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) walking into the Senate Chambers before the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history.
Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) walking into the Senate Chambers before the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>FullscreenRep. John Lewis (D-GA), center, and other Democratic House members walk into the Senate chambers before the Senate rejected a pair of dueling bills Thursday.
Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), center, and other Democratic House members walk into the Senate chambers before the Senate rejected a pair of dueling bills Thursday. Jack Gruber, USA TODAY>Fullscreen1/24/19 2:01:40 PM -- Washington, DC, U.S.A  -- Sen. John Kennedy, R-LA , heads for the Senate chambers after talking to the media before the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history.  --    Photo by Jack Gruber, USA TODAY staff ORG XMIT:  JG 137783 Features from DC 1/24 (Via OlyDrop)
1/24/19 2:01:40 PM -- Washington, DC, U.S.A -- Sen. John Kennedy, R-LA , heads for the Senate chambers after talking to the media before the Senate voted to reject a pair of dueling bills Thursday to fund the federal government and end the longest partial government shutdown in history. -- Photo by Jack Gruber, USA TODAY staff ORG XMIT: JG 137783 Features from DC 1/24 (Via OlyDrop) Jack Gruber, USAT>FullscreenSen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, reacts to a reporters question as she arrives at the U.S. Capitol building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019.
Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, reacts to a reporters question as she arrives at the U.S. Capitol building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenSpeaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters a day after officially postponing President Donald Trump's State of the Union address until the government is fully reopened, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019.
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters a day after officially postponing President Donald Trump's State of the Union address until the government is fully reopened, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite, AP>FullscreenThe Capitol is seen early Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, as rain falls on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, with the partial government shutdown in its second month. The Senate will vote on two competing proposals today to end the impasse, but neither seems to have enough votes to advance.
The Capitol is seen early Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, as rain falls on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, with the partial government shutdown in its second month. The Senate will vote on two competing proposals today to end the impasse, but neither seems to have enough votes to advance. J. Scott Applewhite, AP>FullscreenDemocratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy, right, Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, second from right, and Senate democrats carry photographs of furloughed federal workers during a press conference urging President Trump to reopen the government outside the US Capitol Capitol in Washington, DC. on Jan. 16, 2019. Senate democrats outlined effects the shutdown, now in its 25th day, is having on American workers and families and called on President Trump to reopen the government immediately.
Democratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy, right, Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, second from right, and Senate democrats carry photographs of furloughed federal workers during a press conference urging President Trump to reopen the government outside the US Capitol Capitol in Washington, DC. on Jan. 16, 2019. Senate democrats outlined effects the shutdown, now in its 25th day, is having on American workers and families and called on President Trump to reopen the government immediately. Shawn Thew, EPA-EFE>FullscreenFaye Smith, a furloughed Smithsonian contract worker who has not been paid during the partial government shutdown, holds an unpaid electric bill to present to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, Jan. 16, 2019  Furloughed contract workers have not received back pay from previous government shutdowns, unlikely employees who work directly for the federal government. Four weeks into the US government shutdown, cash-strapped federal workers are tapping life-savings, selling possessions and turning to soup kitchens to make ends meet ramping up pressure for leaders in Washington to strike a deal.
Faye Smith, a furloughed Smithsonian contract worker who has not been paid during the partial government shutdown, holds an unpaid electric bill to present to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, Jan. 16, 2019 Furloughed contract workers have not received back pay from previous government shutdowns, unlikely employees who work directly for the federal government. Four weeks into the US government shutdown, cash-strapped federal workers are tapping life-savings, selling possessions and turning to soup kitchens to make ends meet ramping up pressure for leaders in Washington to strike a deal. Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., second from left, and Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, second from right, wait for other freshman Congressmen to deliver a letter calling to an end to the government shutdown to deliver to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., second from left, and Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, second from right, wait for other freshman Congressmen to deliver a letter calling to an end to the government shutdown to deliver to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenSen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, walk into an event with furloughed federal workers amid the partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., right, walk into an event with furloughed federal workers amid the partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenDoors at the Internal Revenue Service in the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building are locked and covered with blinds as a sign posted advises that the office will be closed during the partial government shutdown Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle.
Doors at the Internal Revenue Service in the Henry M. Jackson Federal Building are locked and covered with blinds as a sign posted advises that the office will be closed during the partial government shutdown Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. Elaine Thompson, AP>FullscreenSeveral dozen federal employees and supporters demonstrated at the Sacramento International Airport calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end then partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif.
Several dozen federal employees and supporters demonstrated at the Sacramento International Airport calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end then partial government shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli, AP>FullscreenFederal employees and family members that have been affected by the ongoing shutdown of the US federal government leave with free meals provided to them by World Central Kitchen, at Jose Andres' ThinkFoodLab in Washington, DC. on Jan. 16, 2019. The disaster relief nonprofit World Central Kitchen, led by celebrity chef Jose Andres, opened a Washington DC feeding site 16 January to try to help some of the 800,000 federal workers that are either working without pay or have been furloughed. Free hot meals and to-go meals will be provided everyday, including weekends.
Federal employees and family members that have been affected by the ongoing shutdown of the US federal government leave with free meals provided to them by World Central Kitchen, at Jose Andres' ThinkFoodLab in Washington, DC. on Jan. 16, 2019. The disaster relief nonprofit World Central Kitchen, led by celebrity chef Jose Andres, opened a Washington DC feeding site 16 January to try to help some of the 800,000 federal workers that are either working without pay or have been furloughed. Free hot meals and to-go meals will be provided everyday, including weekends. Michael Reynolds, EPA-EFE>FullscreenA TSA worker helps passengers at the Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time.
A TSA worker helps passengers at the Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. Rick Bowmer, AP>FullscreenFood and other goods that donors dropped off are collected on a cart to be moved to a distribution point for TSA workers at Orlando International Airport Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla.
Food and other goods that donors dropped off are collected on a cart to be moved to a distribution point for TSA workers at Orlando International Airport Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. John Raoux, AP>FullscreenA sign outside the closed National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan is seen on Jan. 12, 2019, as the partial US government shutdown entered a record 22nd.
A sign outside the closed National Museum of the American Indian in Lower Manhattan is seen on Jan. 12, 2019, as the partial US government shutdown entered a record 22nd. Johannes Eisele, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenThe entrance of the Miami International Airport's Terminal G remained closed due to the government shutdown, in Miami, Florida, USA, 12 January 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on Jan. 12, 2019 surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed 'essential', who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with January 11 marking the first missed paycheck.
The entrance of the Miami International Airport's Terminal G remained closed due to the government shutdown, in Miami, Florida, USA, 12 January 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on Jan. 12, 2019 surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed 'essential', who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with January 11 marking the first missed paycheck. Cristobal Herrera, EPA-EFE>FullscreenUS Secret Service officers stands post on Pennsylvania Avenue outside of the White House in Washington, DC on Jan. 12, 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government, now the longest in US history, has many federal employees including Secret Service agents and officers working unpaid.
US Secret Service officers stands post on Pennsylvania Avenue outside of the White House in Washington, DC on Jan. 12, 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government, now the longest in US history, has many federal employees including Secret Service agents and officers working unpaid. Shawn Thew, EPA-EFE>FullscreenAn empty entrance line is seen as signs hang on the doors of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture indicating that the museum is closed because of the partial government shutdown in Washington, DC, Jan. 9, 2019. A cornered President Donald Trump will hold talks with congressional leaders Wednesday over his demand for a US-Mexico border wall, with his options running out for ending a prolonged partial government shutdown over the impasse. Trump gave a nine-minute prime-time address Tuesday night to make the case for his signature domestic policy idea, but made no concessions to opposition Democrats, who have rejected funding for the project.
An empty entrance line is seen as signs hang on the doors of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture indicating that the museum is closed because of the partial government shutdown in Washington, DC, Jan. 9, 2019. A cornered President Donald Trump will hold talks with congressional leaders Wednesday over his demand for a US-Mexico border wall, with his options running out for ending a prolonged partial government shutdown over the impasse. Trump gave a nine-minute prime-time address Tuesday night to make the case for his signature domestic policy idea, but made no concessions to opposition Democrats, who have rejected funding for the project. Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenMembers of the US Secret Service Uniformed Division patrol outside of the White House in Washington, DC, Jan. 9, 2019, on the 18th day of the partial government shutdown.
Members of the US Secret Service Uniformed Division patrol outside of the White House in Washington, DC, Jan. 9, 2019, on the 18th day of the partial government shutdown. Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenU.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is chased by members of the media after he returned to the U.S. Capitol from a meeting at the White House Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump walked out of a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House negotiating border security funding and government shutdown, calling it a total waste of time.
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is chased by members of the media after he returned to the U.S. Capitol from a meeting at the White House Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump walked out of a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House negotiating border security funding and government shutdown, calling it a total waste of time. Alex Wong, Getty Images>FullscreenPassengers wait in a Transportation Security Administration line at JFK airport on Jan. 09, 2019 in New York City. Its been reported that hundreds of TSA screeners and agents have called in sick from their shifts from a number of major airports as the partial government shutdown continues. Employees of the TSA, whose job it is to keep airlines safe, are being forced to work without knowing when their next paycheck is coming.
Passengers wait in a Transportation Security Administration line at JFK airport on Jan. 09, 2019 in New York City. Its been reported that hundreds of TSA screeners and agents have called in sick from their shifts from a number of major airports as the partial government shutdown continues. Employees of the TSA, whose job it is to keep airlines safe, are being forced to work without knowing when their next paycheck is coming. Spencer Platt, Getty Images>FullscreenU.S. Senate Minoirty Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) returns to the U.S. Capitol from a meeting at the White House January 9, 2019 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Senate Minoirty Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) returns to the U.S. Capitol from a meeting at the White House January 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong, Getty Images>FullscreenHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, listens as Vice President Mike Pence, right, speaks to reporters following a meeting with President Donald Trump and Democratic congressional leaders at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019.
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, listens as Vice President Mike Pence, right, speaks to reporters following a meeting with President Donald Trump and Democratic congressional leaders at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Susan Walsh, AP>FullscreenHouse Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., holds his notes as he talks with reporters following a meeting with Congressional leaders and President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019.
House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., holds his notes as he talks with reporters following a meeting with Congressional leaders and President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Susan Walsh, AP>FullscreenHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, speaks about her oath of office as she stands next to Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., left, and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., right, following their meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, speaks about her oath of office as she stands next to Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., left, and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., right, following their meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Susan Walsh, AP>FullscreenPresident Donald Trump, accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks to the media after a Senate Republican policy lunch on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington.
President Donald Trump, accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks to the media after a Senate Republican policy lunch on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2018, in Washington. Jose Luis Magana, AP>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell  listens as President Donald Trump talks to reporters in 2018.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell listens as President Donald Trump talks to reporters in 2018. Evan Vucci/AP>FullscreenA "Closed" sign is seen during a news conference after a House Democratic Caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. House Democrats gathered to discuss the Democratic agenda as the partial government shutdown enters day 19.
A "Closed" sign is seen during a news conference after a House Democratic Caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. House Democrats gathered to discuss the Democratic agenda as the partial government shutdown enters day 19. Alex Wong, Getty Images>FullscreenActivists hold a lit "FAKE CRISIS" sign as they stage a protest outside the White House in response to U.S. President Donald Trumps prime time address to the nation Jan. 8, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump urged Congress to fund $5.7 billion for a border wall.
Activists hold a lit "FAKE CRISIS" sign as they stage a protest outside the White House in response to U.S. President Donald Trumps prime time address to the nation Jan. 8, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump urged Congress to fund $5.7 billion for a border wall. Alex Wong, Getty Images>FullscreenThe Washington skyline is seen on day 19 of a partial government shutdown on the morning after President Donald Trump used a prime-time TV address from the Oval Office to urge congressional Democrats to relent on their opposition to his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. From left are the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument, and the U.S. Capitol.
The Washington skyline is seen on day 19 of a partial government shutdown on the morning after President Donald Trump used a prime-time TV address from the Oval Office to urge congressional Democrats to relent on their opposition to his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. From left are the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument, and the U.S. Capitol. J. Scott Applewhite, AP>FullscreenThe entrance to Fort Point National Historic Site, a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate Bride, a popular tourist site is closed in San Francisco, Calif. on Jan. 8, 2019.
The entrance to Fort Point National Historic Site, a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate Bride, a popular tourist site is closed in San Francisco, Calif. on Jan. 8, 2019. John G. Mabanglo, EPA-EFE>FullscreenMembers of American Legion Post 416 watch President Donald Trump speak on Jan. 8, 2019 in Encinitas, California.  The president spoke in his first prime-time address from the Oval Office in an effort to build support for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall.
Members of American Legion Post 416 watch President Donald Trump speak on Jan. 8, 2019 in Encinitas, California. The president spoke in his first prime-time address from the Oval Office in an effort to build support for $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall. Sandy Huffaker, Getty Images>FullscreenPeople walk past a sign announcing that New York funds are keeping the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island open for visitors on Jan. 5, 2019, in New York, as the US government shutdown enters its third week.
People walk past a sign announcing that New York funds are keeping the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island open for visitors on Jan. 5, 2019, in New York, as the US government shutdown enters its third week. Don Emmert, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenVice President Mike Pence, left, White House legislative affairs aide Ja'Ron Smith, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, second row left, White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner, and others, walk down the steps of the Eisenhower Executive Office building, on the White House complex, after a meeting with staff members of House and Senate leadership, Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019, in Washington.
Vice President Mike Pence, left, White House legislative affairs aide Ja'Ron Smith, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, second row left, White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner, and others, walk down the steps of the Eisenhower Executive Office building, on the White House complex, after a meeting with staff members of House and Senate leadership, Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019, in Washington. Alex Brandon, AP>FullscreenThe Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum is closed during the partial government shutdown, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 in Washington.
The Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum is closed during the partial government shutdown, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 in Washington. Alex Brandon, AP>FullscreenWorkmen from the commercial cleanup company 1-800-GOT-JUNK clean up trash on The Ellipse, south of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. As the company donates its resources to clean up, US President Donald J. Trump is scheduled to meet at the White House with congressional leadership in hopes of ending the partial government shutdown now in its 12th day.
Workmen from the commercial cleanup company 1-800-GOT-JUNK clean up trash on The Ellipse, south of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. As the company donates its resources to clean up, US President Donald J. Trump is scheduled to meet at the White House with congressional leadership in hopes of ending the partial government shutdown now in its 12th day. Shawn Thew, EPA-EFE>FullscreenEmma James, right, and co-worker Vincent Cuenca demonstrate outside the Federal Center on Goodfellow Boulevard, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 in St. Louis.  James is a processor in the multifamily housing division. Cuenta processes payments to FEMA contractors.
Emma James, right, and co-worker Vincent Cuenca demonstrate outside the Federal Center on Goodfellow Boulevard, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 in St. Louis. James is a processor in the multifamily housing division. Cuenta processes payments to FEMA contractors. Christian Gooden, St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP>FullscreenPresident Donald J. Trump holds a news conference beside US Vice President Mike Pence, left,, Republican Representative from Louisiana Steve Scalise (2-R) and House Minority Leader Republican Kevin McCarthy, right, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. President Trump discussed a variety of topics, particularly his meeting with Congressional Democratic and Republican leaders for negotiations on the ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government. A partial shutdown of the government continues since Congress and Trump failed to strike a deal on border security before a 22 December 22, 2018 funding deadline.
President Donald J. Trump holds a news conference beside US Vice President Mike Pence, left,, Republican Representative from Louisiana Steve Scalise (2-R) and House Minority Leader Republican Kevin McCarthy, right, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. President Trump discussed a variety of topics, particularly his meeting with Congressional Democratic and Republican leaders for negotiations on the ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government. A partial shutdown of the government continues since Congress and Trump failed to strike a deal on border security before a 22 December 22, 2018 funding deadline. Michael Reynolds, EPA-EFE>FullscreenVolunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns.
Volunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. Mario Tama, Getty Images>FullscreenDemocratic Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi returns to the US Capitol after a meeting with US President Donald Trump over the ongoing partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. Though Democrats called the meeting 'contentious,' President Trump said the meeting was 'productive'.
Democratic Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi returns to the US Capitol after a meeting with US President Donald Trump over the ongoing partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. Though Democrats called the meeting 'contentious,' President Trump said the meeting was 'productive'. Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSigns announce the visitor center at the DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri Valley, Iowa, is closed, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, as the partial government shutdown continues.
Signs announce the visitor center at the DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri Valley, Iowa, is closed, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, as the partial government shutdown continues. Nati Harnik, AP>FullscreenBrandon Torres, center, the Branch Chief of Emergency Services at Grand Canyon National Park, directs guests in the park on Jan. 4, 2019.
Brandon Torres, center, the Branch Chief of Emergency Services at Grand Canyon National Park, directs guests in the park on Jan. 4, 2019. Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic via USA TODAY Network>FullscreenA sign blocks a snowed in walk way at Grand Canyon National Park on Jan. 4, 2019. The park was staffed at minimum capacity due to the government shutdown but retained much of its services due to an executive order issued by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to run the park with state funds in the event of a shutdown.
A sign blocks a snowed in walk way at Grand Canyon National Park on Jan. 4, 2019. The park was staffed at minimum capacity due to the government shutdown but retained much of its services due to an executive order issued by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to run the park with state funds in the event of a shutdown. Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic via USA TODAY Network>FullscreenThe Capitol building is visible as a man throws garbage away during a partial government shutdown on the National Mall in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2018. Trash cans on the Mall are not being emptied during the shutdown.
The Capitol building is visible as a man throws garbage away during a partial government shutdown on the National Mall in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2018. Trash cans on the Mall are not being emptied during the shutdown. Andrew Harnik, AP>FullscreenA sign is posted on a fence near an entrance to the Bunker Hill Monument, Monday, Dec. 24, 2018, in Boston. The historic site, erected to commemorate the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill, and run by the National Park Service, was closed Monday due to a partial federal government shutdown. The federal government is expected to remain partially closed past Christmas Day in a protracted standoff over President Donald Trump's demand for money to build a border wall with Mexico.
A sign is posted on a fence near an entrance to the Bunker Hill Monument, Monday, Dec. 24, 2018, in Boston. The historic site, erected to commemorate the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill, and run by the National Park Service, was closed Monday due to a partial federal government shutdown. The federal government is expected to remain partially closed past Christmas Day in a protracted standoff over President Donald Trump's demand for money to build a border wall with Mexico. Steven Senne, AP>FullscreenThe empty U.S. Capitol Rotunda is seen in Washington during a partial government shutdown Monday, Dec. 24, 2018. Both sides in the long-running fight over funding President Donald Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall appear to have moved toward each other, but a shutdown of one-fourth of the federal government entered Christmas without a clear resolution in sight.
The empty U.S. Capitol Rotunda is seen in Washington during a partial government shutdown Monday, Dec. 24, 2018. Both sides in the long-running fight over funding President Donald Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall appear to have moved toward each other, but a shutdown of one-fourth of the federal government entered Christmas without a clear resolution in sight. Manuel Balce Ceneta, AP>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell, center, is surrounded by reporters after leaving the Senate chamber at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018.
Senate Majority Leader, Republican Mitch McConnell, center, is surrounded by reporters after leaving the Senate chamber at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. Erik S. Lesser, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSenate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is met by reporters as he arrives at the Capitol on the first morning of a partial government shutdown, as Democratic lawmakers, and some Republicans, are at odds with President Donald Trump on spending for his border wall, in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018.
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is met by reporters as he arrives at the Capitol on the first morning of a partial government shutdown, as Democratic lawmakers, and some Republicans, are at odds with President Donald Trump on spending for his border wall, in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018. J. Scott Applewhite, AP>FullscreenJamie Parrish, from Minneapolis, takes a selfie in front of the closed sign at the National Archives, Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018 in Washington. The House and Senate are gaveling back in for a rare weekend session amid a partial government shutdown over President Donald Trump's demand for billions of dollars for a border wall.
Jamie Parrish, from Minneapolis, takes a selfie in front of the closed sign at the National Archives, Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018 in Washington. The House and Senate are gaveling back in for a rare weekend session amid a partial government shutdown over President Donald Trump's demand for billions of dollars for a border wall. Alex Brandon, AP>FullscreenA sign alerts visitors to the closure of the White House Visitor Center on the first day of a partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018.
A sign alerts visitors to the closure of the White House Visitor Center on the first day of a partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA-EFE>FullscreenThe US Capitol on the first morning of a partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. Earlier in the week, President Trump rejected a Senate-passed continuing resolution to fund the federal government because it did not include money for his border wall. Though President Trump said he was 'proud' to shut the government down, lawmakers will meet again today to negotiate a way around the stalemate.
The US Capitol on the first morning of a partial government shutdown in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. Earlier in the week, President Trump rejected a Senate-passed continuing resolution to fund the federal government because it did not include money for his border wall. Though President Trump said he was 'proud' to shut the government down, lawmakers will meet again today to negotiate a way around the stalemate. Jim Lo Scalzo, EPA-EFE>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell, center, is followed by members of the news media as he walks from the Senate floor on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on Dec. 21, 2018. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through Feb. 8, 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall.
Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell, center, is followed by members of the news media as he walks from the Senate floor on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on Dec. 21, 2018. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through Feb. 8, 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall. MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA-EFE>FullscreenVice President Mike Pence, right, acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, center, and Senior Advisor to US President Donald J. Trump, Jared Kushner, left, walk from the House of Representatives to the Senate at the US Capitol on Friday.
Vice President Mike Pence, right, acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, center, and Senior Advisor to US President Donald J. Trump, Jared Kushner, left, walk from the House of Representatives to the Senate at the US Capitol on Friday. ERIK S. LESSER/EPA-EFE>FullscreenOutgoing Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) (C) returns to his office after votes in the U.S. Capitol, Friday. The U.S. Senate considered a budget bill passed Thursday by the House of Representatives that would fund the federal government and includes more than $500 million for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. The Senate is unlikely to pass the bill with the wall funding, moving the government closer to a partial shut down just days before the Christmas holiday.
Outgoing Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) (C) returns to his office after votes in the U.S. Capitol, Friday. The U.S. Senate considered a budget bill passed Thursday by the House of Representatives that would fund the federal government and includes more than $500 million for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. The Senate is unlikely to pass the bill with the wall funding, moving the government closer to a partial shut down just days before the Christmas holiday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images>FullscreenHouse Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, the speaker-designate for the new Congress, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., leave after talking to reporters as a revised spending bill is introduced in the House that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, on Dec. 20, 2018.
House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, the speaker-designate for the new Congress, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., leave after talking to reporters as a revised spending bill is introduced in the House that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, on Dec. 20, 2018. J. Scott Applewhite/AP>FullscreenDemocratic House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (R) and Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (C) speak to the media, Thursday, as lawmakers prepare to vote on a new budget resolution to avert a government shutdown.
Democratic House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (R) and Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (C) speak to the media, Thursday, as lawmakers prepare to vote on a new budget resolution to avert a government shutdown. JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE>FullscreenRepublican Majority Whip from California Kevin McCarthy (C) leaves the Capitol, Thursday, for the White House to negotiate a budget vote to avert a government shutdown in the US Capitol. The Senate passed a continuing resolution on Wednesday, to keep the government open until February 2019. Others are not identified members of the media.
Republican Majority Whip from California Kevin McCarthy (C) leaves the Capitol, Thursday, for the White House to negotiate a budget vote to avert a government shutdown in the US Capitol. The Senate passed a continuing resolution on Wednesday, to keep the government open until February 2019. Others are not identified members of the media. JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE>FullscreenChairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations Republican Richard Shelby (C) speaks to members of the news media shortly before leaving to attend a meeting at the White House held by US President Donald J. Trump, on Capitol Hill, Friday. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through 08 February 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall.
Chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations Republican Richard Shelby (C) speaks to members of the news media shortly before leaving to attend a meeting at the White House held by US President Donald J. Trump, on Capitol Hill, Friday. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through 08 February 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall. MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA-EFE>FullscreenSpeaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) makes a statement to the press after a meeting with US President Donald Trump at the White House Thursday.
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) makes a statement to the press after a meeting with US President Donald Trump at the White House Thursday. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenHouse Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center, accompanied by House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., center right, speaks to reporters outside the West Wing of the White House following a meeting with President Donald Trump on border security.
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., center, accompanied by House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., center right, speaks to reporters outside the West Wing of the White House following a meeting with President Donald Trump on border security. Andrew Harnik/AP>FullscreenSenate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell arrives at the Senate Carriage entrance upon returning from the White House where he attended a meeting held by President Donald J. Trump, on Friday. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through February 8, 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall.
Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell arrives at the Senate Carriage entrance upon returning from the White House where he attended a meeting held by President Donald J. Trump, on Friday. President Trump rejected a continuing resolution to fund the federal government through February 8, 2019, threatening a partial shutdown unless funding is included for his border wall. MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA-EFE>Fullscreen

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    "Over the next 21 days I expect that both Democrats and Republicans will operate in good faith," the president said. "This is an opportunity for all parties to work together for the benefit of our whole beautiful, wonderful nation."

    Money for border wall is not part of deal

    While the president agreed to reopen the federal government, no border wall money was part of the deal.

    The deal will allow the parts of the federal government that were shuttered to reopen for three weeks under the same funding those departments had last year, passing a continuing resolution.

    But the $5.7 billion Trump requested to construct a wall along the southern border isn't going away. The president is giving lawmakers three weeks to come to some sort of compromise on border security. It's unclear what might happen if negotiations go poorly and a deal isn't made by Feb. 15.

    The president used his address on Friday to continue laying out his reasoning on why a border wall is needed and pointing out that Democrats in the past had agreed to similar barriers in the past. 

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    Airline employees hug before a press conference on aviation safety during the shutdown at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va. on Jan.24, 2019.
    Airline employees hug before a press conference on aviation safety during the shutdown at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va. on Jan.24, 2019. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenA Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) worker looks at a passenger going through security at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, on Jan. 24, 2019. Air transport workers warned the five-week-old US government shutdown could cause US commercial aviation to collapse as they planned a protest in the US capital's National Airport. They also pointed to the lengthening of passenger inspection times in airports due to an increasing number of workers for the TSA not showing up.
    A Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) worker looks at a passenger going through security at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, on Jan. 24, 2019. Air transport workers warned the five-week-old US government shutdown could cause US commercial aviation to collapse as they planned a protest in the US capital's National Airport. They also pointed to the lengthening of passenger inspection times in airports due to an increasing number of workers for the TSA not showing up. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenAn American Airlines ground staff member walks towards planes on the tarmac at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia on Jan. 24, 2019.  American Airlines executives warned of significant travel delays if the US government shutdown goes on much longer, but said that customer demand has not been significantly affected thus far.
    An American Airlines ground staff member walks towards planes on the tarmac at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia on Jan. 24, 2019. American Airlines executives warned of significant travel delays if the US government shutdown goes on much longer, but said that customer demand has not been significantly affected thus far. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenPeople demonstrate in Richmond, Va., to support The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Bureau of Prisons employees who are affected by the partial government shut down Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019.
    People demonstrate in Richmond, Va., to support The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Bureau of Prisons employees who are affected by the partial government shut down Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. Alexa Welch Edlund, Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP>FullscreenMississippi Department of Child Protection Services Commissioner Jess Dickinson, left, briefs the lawmakers on the department's budget requests at the House Appropriations Committee at the Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, in Jackson, Miss. The committee was also told welfare and child protection agencies could have to begin furloughing some workers without pay because federal money has been interrupted by the federal government shutdown.
    Mississippi Department of Child Protection Services Commissioner Jess Dickinson, left, briefs the lawmakers on the department's budget requests at the House Appropriations Committee at the Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019, in Jackson, Miss. The committee was also told welfare and child protection agencies could have to begin furloughing some workers without pay because federal money has been interrupted by the federal government shutdown. Rogelio V. Solis, AP>FullscreenFederal employees holding empty plates stage a rally to call for a vote on the shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on Jan. 23, 2019.
    Federal employees holding empty plates stage a rally to call for a vote on the shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on Jan. 23, 2019. Jim Watson, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenUnion leaders and federal workers participate in a civil disobedience outside the office of Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) at Senate Russell Office Building Jan. 23, 2019 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Federal employees from different unions participated in a "Occupy Hart" protest on Capitol Hill against the partial government shutdown.
    Union leaders and federal workers participate in a civil disobedience outside the office of Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) at Senate Russell Office Building Jan. 23, 2019 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Federal employees from different unions participated in a "Occupy Hart" protest on Capitol Hill against the partial government shutdown. Alex Wong, Getty Images>FullscreenTSA employee Princess Young, center, loads food into a car after visiting a food pantry for furloughed government workers affected by the federal shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Baltimore.
    TSA employee Princess Young, center, loads food into a car after visiting a food pantry for furloughed government workers affected by the federal shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Baltimore. Patrick Semansky, AP>FullscreenA woman displays her thoughts, written out on a disposable plate, during the 'Occupy Hart' protest against the partial government shutdown sponsored by American Federation of Government Employees at the Hart Senate Office Building at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on 23 Jan. 23, 2019. Federal workers and their supporters stood silently for 33 minutes for the 33 days of the shutdown.
    A woman displays her thoughts, written out on a disposable plate, during the 'Occupy Hart' protest against the partial government shutdown sponsored by American Federation of Government Employees at the Hart Senate Office Building at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on 23 Jan. 23, 2019. Federal workers and their supporters stood silently for 33 minutes for the 33 days of the shutdown. Erik S. Lesser, EPA-EFE>FullscreenChris George, a federal employee furloughed from his job as a forestry technician supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, takes off his boots at his home adorned with an American flag after spending the day working as a handyman Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019, in Hemet, Calif.
    Chris George, a federal employee furloughed from his job as a forestry technician supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, takes off his boots at his home adorned with an American flag after spending the day working as a handyman Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019, in Hemet, Calif. "I have a lot of pride, so asking for help is difficult for me. It's very difficult for me because I'm always the one giving back or putting myself before anybody else," said George. "Now, here I am in the situation where I'm the one that is in need." Jae C. Hong, AP>FullscreenTSA worker Amelia Williams is given a bottle of milk at a food bank for government workers affected by the shutdown, Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ORG XMIT: NYML106
    TSA worker Amelia Williams is given a bottle of milk at a food bank for government workers affected by the shutdown, Jan. 22, 2019, in the Brooklyn borough of New York.  Mark Lennihan, AP>FullscreenWASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Celebrity Chef Jose Andres (R) helps carry free meals for U.S. Park Police outside his World Central Kitchen January 22, 2019 in Washington, DC. Founded by Andres, World Central Kitchen is a not-for-profit non-governmental organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters. The pop-up kitchen has been providing meals to workers affected by the partial federal government shutdown since January 16 and started giving away groceries and providing other services this week. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775286268 ORIG FILE ID: 1097995860
    Chef Jose Andres (R) helps carry free meals for U.S. Park Police outside his World Central Kitchen Jan. 22, 2019 in Washington, DC. Founded by Andres, World Central Kitchen is a not-for-profit non-governmental organization devoted to providing meals in the wake of natural disasters. The pop-up kitchen has been providing meals to workers affected by the partial federal government shutdown since Jan. 16 and started giving away groceries and providing other services this week.  Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images>FullscreenFurloughed EPA worker Jeff Herrema holds a sign outside the offices of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, in Park Hills, Ky., Tuesday, Jan 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston) ORG XMIT: KYBW109
    Furloughed EPA worker Jeff Herrema holds a sign outside the offices of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, in Park Hills, Ky., Jan 22, 2019. Bryan Woolston, AP>FullscreenIn this Jan. 21, 2019 photo, Brendan Maos, left, walks with his grandmother Darlene Maos, center, and Sylvia Jones as they leave Jon Bon Jovi's community kitchen, Soul Kitchen, in Red Bank, N.J. after being served a free lunch. The kitchen served free meals to furloughed federal workers and their families. Darlene Maos and Jones are federal employees. (Ed Murray/NJ Advance Media for NJ.com via AP) ORG XMIT: NJNEW102
    Brendan Maos, left, walks with his grandmother Darlene Maos, center, and Sylvia Jones as they leave Jon Bon Jovi's community kitchen, Soul Kitchen, in Red Bank, N.J. after being served a free lunch on Jan. 21, 2019. The kitchen served free meals to furloughed federal workers and their families. Darlene Maos and Jones are federal employees Ed Murray, NJ Advance Media for NJ.com via AP>FullscreenHundreds of volunteers and recipients Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019 at Help for Hampton Roads Coast Guard Families food drive, sponsored by the Chief Petty Officer Association, in Chesapeake for families affected by the shutdown. (Stephen M. Katz/The Virginian-Pilot via AP) ORG XMIT: VANOV105
    Hundreds of volunteers and recipients gather at the Help for Hampton Roads Coast Guard Families food drive on Jan. 19, 2019, sponsored by the Chief Petty Officer Association, in Chesapeake, Va. for families affected by the shutdown.  Stephen M. Katz, The Virginian-Pilot via AP>FullscreenHundreds of volunteers and recipients Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019 at Help for Hampton Roads Coast Guard Families food drive, sponsored by the Chief Petty Officer Association, in Chesapeake for families affected by the shutdown. (Stephen M. Katz/The Virginian-Pilot via AP) ORG XMIT: VANOV102
    Volunteers and recipients participate in the Help for Hampton Roads Coast Guard Families food drive in Chesapeake, Va. on Jan. 19, 2019. Stephen M. Katz, The Virginian-Pilot via AP>FullscreenDoris Cochran works on "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington, Virginia. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz) ORG XMIT: DCSG102
    Doris Cochran works on "an ugly sweater," which she is planning to sell, Jan. 18, 2019 in her apartment in Arlington, Va., Cochran is a disabled mother of two young boys living in subsidized housing in Arlington. She’s stockpiling canned foods to try to make sure her family won’t go hungry if her food stamps run out. She says she just doesn’t know “what’s going to happen” and that’s what scares her the most.  Sait Serkan Gurbuz, AP>FullscreenVolunteers sign in federal workers outside Phoenix Indian Medical Center wanting to pick up food bank donations  Jan. 18, 2019, in Phoenix. Employees of the hospital, which serves Native Americans, are accepting food from St. Mary's Food Bank as the government shutdown entered its 28th day.
    Volunteers sign in federal workers outside Phoenix Indian Medical Center wanting to pick up food bank donations Jan. 18, 2019, in Phoenix. Employees of the hospital, which serves Native Americans, are accepting food from St. Mary's Food Bank as the government shutdown entered its 28th day. Terry Tang, AP>FullscreenA U.S. Coast Guard member carries a box of free groceries during a food giveaway Jan.  19, 2019 in Novato, Calif. As the partial government shutdown enters its fourth week, an estimated 150 U.S. Coast Guard families in the San Francisco Bay Area, who are currently not being paid, received free groceries during an event organized by the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank and the North Bay Coast Guard Spouses Club.
    A U.S. Coast Guard member carries a box of free groceries during a food giveaway Jan. 19, 2019 in Novato, Calif. As the partial government shutdown enters its fourth week, an estimated 150 U.S. Coast Guard families in the San Francisco Bay Area, who are currently not being paid, received free groceries during an event organized by the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank and the North Bay Coast Guard Spouses Club. Justin Sullivan, Getty Images>Fullscreenepa07290477 Democratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy (R), Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (2-R) and Senate democrats carry photographs of furloughed federal workers during a press conference urging President Trump to reopen the government outside the US Capitol Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 16 January 2019. Senate democrats outlined effects the shutdown, now in its 25th day, is having on American workers and families and called on President Trump to reopen the government immediately.  EPA-EFE/SHAWN THEW ORG XMIT: STX05
    Democratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy (R), Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (2-R) and Senate democrats carry photographs of furloughed federal workers during a press conference urging President Trump to reopen the government outside the Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2019. SHAWN THEW, EPA-EFE>FullscreenFurloughed contract workers, including security officers and custodians who have not been paid during the partial government shutdown, hold unpaid bills to present to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, January 16, 2019. - Furloughed contract workers have not received back pay from previous government shutdowns, unlikely employees who work directly for the federal government.Four weeks into the US government shutdown, cash-strapped federal workers are tapping life-savings, selling possessions and turning to soup kitchens to make ends meet -- ramping up pressure for leaders in Washington to strike a deal. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP)SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images ORIG FILE ID: AFP_1CA9HC
    Furloughed contract workers, including security officers and custodians who have not been paid during the partial government shutdown, hold unpaid bills to present to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, Jan. 16, 2019.  Furloughed contract workers have not received back pay from previous government shutdowns, unlike employees who work directly for the federal government. Four weeks into the US government shutdown, cash-strapped federal workers are tapping life-savings, selling possessions and turning to soup kitchens to make ends meet -- ramping up pressure for leaders in Washington to strike a deal. SAUL LOEB, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenU.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Amy McElroy, left, and Lt. j.g. Sean Hill, who both missed a paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, talk about the stacks of fishing fleet inspections backing-up in the marine inspection office at Sector Puget Sound base Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The four civilian employees who normally handle the paperwork have been furloughed, leaving it to Hill to complete, along with his other duties. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the shutdown, now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) ORG XMIT: WAET108
    U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Amy McElroy, left, and Lt. j.g. Sean Hill, who both missed a paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, talk about the stacks of fishing fleet inspections backing-up in the marine inspection office at Sector Puget Sound base, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The four civilian employees who normally handle the paperwork have been furloughed, leaving it to Hill to complete, along with his other duties. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the shutdown, now in its fourth week. Elaine Thompson, AP>FullscreenFILE In this Wednesday, Jan 16, 2019, file photo, U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, walk off a 45-foot response boat during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base in Seattle. San Antonio-based USAA, a military personnel insurer and financial services company, said Wednesday they has donated $15 million for interest-free loans to Coast Guard members during the partial U.S. government shutdown. The funds will be disbursed by Coast Guard Mutual Assistance. The American Red Cross Hero Care Center will assist. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) ORG XMIT: CER303
    U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, walk off a 45-foot response boat during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base in Seattle on Jan. 16, 2019. Elaine Thompson, AP>FullscreenAaron Hensley, left, is handed Stouffer's meals, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Solon, Ohio. Hensley and Joe Brodt, right, both work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. Hensley has been at NASA eight months and Brodt has just finished his one-year anniversary. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak) ORG XMIT: CD102
    Aaron Hensley, left, is handed Stouffer's meals, Jan. 16, 2019, in Solon, Ohio. Hensley and Joe Brodt, right, both work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. Hensley has been at NASA eight months and Brodt has just finished his one-year anniversary. Tony Dejak, AP>FullscreenA federal employee carries away a bag of free Kraft products outside a pop-up grocery store opened by Kraft to provide humanitarian aid to federal employees who have been affected by the ongoing shutdown in Washington, DC,  Jan. 17,  2019. Kraft opened the site, which will remain open through 20 January, so that federal employees can take a bag of free Kraft groceries home to their families. About 800,000 federal workers have been working without pay or have been furloughed. The shutdown began 22 December 2018 and is now the longest in US history with no clear end in sight.
    A federal employee carries away a bag of free Kraft products outside a pop-up grocery store opened by Kraft to provide humanitarian aid to federal employees who have been affected by the ongoing shutdown in Washington, DC, Jan. 17, 2019. Kraft opened the site, which will remain open through 20 January, so that federal employees can take a bag of free Kraft groceries home to their families. About 800,000 federal workers have been working without pay or have been furloughed. The shutdown began 22 December 2018 and is now the longest in US history with no clear end in sight. MICHAEL REYNOLDS, EPA-EFE>FullscreenA man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. More than two dozen federal employees and supporters called for an end to the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) ORG XMIT: CARP302
    A man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif.  Rich Pedroncelli, AP>FullscreenAirport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) ORG XMIT: UTRB101
    Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time.  Rick Bowmer, AP>FullscreenTSA employee Gary Vetterli prepares a hot dog during lunch at Salt Lake City International Airport, Jan. 16, 2019. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time.
    TSA employee Gary Vetterli prepares a hot dog during lunch at Salt Lake City International Airport, Jan. 16, 2019. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. Rick Bowmer, AP>FullscreenErwin Guzman drops a food and supply donation for TAS workers at Orlando International Airport Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla.  as the partial government shutdown moves through its fourth week Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux) ORG XMIT: FLJR105
    Erwin Guzman drops a food and supply donation for TAS workers at Orlando International Airport, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla.  John Raoux, AP>FullscreenSecurity lines at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta stretch more than an hour long amid the partial federal shutdown, causing some travelers to miss flights, Monday morning, Jan. 14, 2019. The long lines signaled staffing shortages at security checkpoints, as TSA officers have been working without pay since the federal shutdown began Dec. 22.
    Security lines at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta stretch more than an hour long amid the partial federal shutdown, causing some travelers to miss flights, Monday morning, Jan. 14, 2019. The long lines signaled staffing shortages at security checkpoints, as TSA officers have been working without pay since the federal shutdown began Dec. 22. John Spink/AP>FullscreenStatues at the Korean War Veterans Memorial are covered in snow in Washington, DC, on Monday.  Federal offices and schools in the nation's capital are closed following a snowstorm this weekend that left an estimated accumulation of 8 to 12 inches of snow in the area. Despite the shutdown of the federal government, the National Park Service announced it would clear snow.  Almost three hundred miles of roads and over one hundred miles of sidewalks in the greater Washington DC area fall under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service.
    Statues at the Korean War Veterans Memorial are covered in snow in Washington, DC, on Monday. Federal offices and schools in the nation's capital are closed following a snowstorm this weekend that left an estimated accumulation of 8 to 12 inches of snow in the area. Despite the shutdown of the federal government, the National Park Service announced it would clear snow. Almost three hundred miles of roads and over one hundred miles of sidewalks in the greater Washington DC area fall under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service. MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA-EFE>FullscreenJayda Mayfield, 10, carries her lunch tray to her seat in the cafeteria at the The Tommy Douglas Conference Center, Monday, in Silver Spring, MD. Mayfield and her mother Stacy Summerville accepted free meals for furloughed federal workers and their families offered by the Amalgamated Transit Union.
    Jayda Mayfield, 10, carries her lunch tray to her seat in the cafeteria at the The Tommy Douglas Conference Center, Monday, in Silver Spring, MD. Mayfield and her mother Stacy Summerville accepted free meals for furloughed federal workers and their families offered by the Amalgamated Transit Union. Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images>FullscreenRep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), left, greets Consumer Product Safety Commission employee Stacy Summerville as she gathered her lunch provided for furloughed federal workers and their families at the Tommy Douglas Conference Center in Silver Spring, MD, on Monday. The Amalgamated Transit Union will continue to offer meals for federal employees affected by the shutdown all week from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
    Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), left, greets Consumer Product Safety Commission employee Stacy Summerville as she gathered her lunch provided for furloughed federal workers and their families at the Tommy Douglas Conference Center in Silver Spring, MD, on Monday. The Amalgamated Transit Union will continue to offer meals for federal employees affected by the shutdown all week from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images>FullscreenPresident Donald Trump speaks alongside fast food he purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House in on  Jan. 14, 2019.  Trump says the White House chefs are furloughed due to the partial government shutdown.
    President Donald Trump speaks alongside fast food he purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House in on Jan. 14, 2019. Trump says the White House chefs are furloughed due to the partial government shutdown. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenGuests select fast food Donald Trump purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday.
    Guests select fast food Donald Trump purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday. SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenA snowman with a message about the government shutdown is pictured outside Capitol Hill
    A snowman with a message is seen at the Capitol in Washington on the 24th day of a partial government shutdown, Jan. 14, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite, AP Images>FullscreenA travelers walks past a closed down terminal at the Miami International Airport on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019, in Miami. The partial government shutdown is starting to strain the national aviation system, with unpaid security screeners staying home, air-traffic controllers suing the government and safety inspectors off the job. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson) ORG XMIT: FLBA106
    A traveler walks past a closed down terminal at the Miami International Airport on Jan. 12, 2019, in Miami. The partial government shutdown is starting to strain the national aviation system, with unpaid security screeners staying home, air-traffic controllers suing the government and safety inspectors off the job.  Brynn Anderson, AP>Fullscreenepaselect epa07278513 A TSA officer closes the entrance of the Miami International Airport's Terminal G, during the ongoing the government shutdown, in Miami, Florida, USA, 12 January 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on 12 January, surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed 'essential', who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with 11 January marking the first missed paycheck.  EPA-EFE/CRISTOBAL HERRERA ORG XMIT: CHU02
    A TSA officer closes the entrance of the Miami International Airport's Terminal G, during the ongoing the government shutdown, in Miami on Jan. 12,  2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on Jan. 12, surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed 'essential', who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with Jan. 11 marking the first missed paycheck. CRISTOBAL HERRERA, EPA-EFE>FullscreenTSA agent Anthony Morselli of Georgia, VT, shows his GoFundMe post on Facebook before starting his shift at Burlington International Airport on Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. Morselli and his wife, both TSA agents, didn't get paid along with approximately 800,000 other federal workers and, to try to make ends meet, started the GoFundMe site to try to pay the bills as the government shutdown entered it's 21st day. (Via OlyDrop)
    TSA agent Anthony Morselli of Georgia, VT, shows his GoFundMe post on Facebook before starting his shift at Burlington International Airport on Jan. 11, 2019. Morselli and his wife, both TSA agents, didn't get paid along with approximately 800,000 other federal workers and, to try to make ends meet, started the GoFundMe site to try to pay the bills as the government shutdown entered it's 21st day. RYAN MERCER, BURLINGTON FREE PRESS VIA USA TODAY NETWORK>FullscreenNia Tagoai, a patient scheduler at a clinic offering health care and other services operated by the Seattle Indian Health Board, works at her desk Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, in Seattle.   Fallout from the federal government shutdown is hurting hundreds of Native American tribes and entities that serve them. The pain is especially deep in tribal communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment, and where one person often supports an extended family.  (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) ORG XMIT: WATW205
    Nia Tagoai, a patient scheduler at a clinic offering health care and other services operated by the Seattle Indian Health Board, works at her desk on  Jan. 11, 2019, in Seattle. Fallout from the federal government shutdown is hurting hundreds of Native American tribes and entities that serve them. The pain is especially deep in tribal communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment, and where one person often supports an extended family. Ted S. Warren, AP>FullscreenTables sit empty during dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala., Jan.. 9, 2019. Business at the restaurant is off at least 35 percent since the partial federal shutdown began.
    Tables sit empty during dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala., Jan.. 9, 2019. Business at the restaurant is off at least 35 percent since the partial federal shutdown began. David Goldman, AP>FullscreenA worker walks through the empty lobby of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' National Center for Explosives Training and Research in Huntsville, Ala.,  Jan. 9, 2019. About 70 federal agencies are located at the Army's sprawling Redstone Arsenal, and more than half the area economy is tied to Washington spending.
    A worker walks through the empty lobby of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' National Center for Explosives Training and Research in Huntsville, Ala., Jan. 9, 2019. About 70 federal agencies are located at the Army's sprawling Redstone Arsenal, and more than half the area economy is tied to Washington spending. David Goldman, AP>FullscreenJack Lyons, a contractor working on massive rocket test stands for NASA, stands in his workshop while spending the furlough on his small side business making props for marching bands, in Madison, Ala., Jan. 8, 2019.
    Jack Lyons, a contractor working on massive rocket test stands for NASA, stands in his workshop while spending the furlough on his small side business making props for marching bands, in Madison, Ala., Jan. 8, 2019. "They're trying to use people as bargaining chips, and it just isn't right," Lyons said. Unlike civil service workers who expect to eventually get back pay, Lyons doesn't know if he'll ever see a dollar from the shutdown period. David Goldman, AP>FullscreenKatie Barron gestures while looking at a pay increase notice for her children's day care, in her home in Madison, Ala., Jan. 9, 2019. Barron's husband is a National Weather Service meteorologist forced to work without pay during the shutdown because his job is classified as essential. They've put off home and car maintenance, but the $450-a-week bill for day care still has to be paid, as do the mortgage and utility bills.
    Katie Barron gestures while looking at a pay increase notice for her children's day care, in her home in Madison, Ala., Jan. 9, 2019. Barron's husband is a National Weather Service meteorologist forced to work without pay during the shutdown because his job is classified as essential. They've put off home and car maintenance, but the $450-a-week bill for day care still has to be paid, as do the mortgage and utility bills. David Goldman, AP>FullscreenKeisha Brown, 40, stands outside her home in the the Harriman Park neighborhood in Birmingham, Ala. on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019.  Brown's home is within a designated Superfund site in north Birmingham.  The EPA has been removing contaminated soil from yards in the neighborhoods within the site. The partial government shutdown has forced suspension of federal work at the nation's Superfund sites unless it is determined there is an
    Keisha Brown, 40, stands outside her home in the the Harriman Park neighborhood in Birmingham, Ala. on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Brown's home is within a designated Superfund site in north Birmingham. The EPA has been removing contaminated soil from yards in the neighborhoods within the site. The partial government shutdown has forced suspension of federal work at the nation's Superfund sites unless it is determined there is an "imminent threat" to life or property. Kimberly Chandler, AP>FullscreenFederal Aviation Administration employee Michael Jessie, who is currently working without pay as an aviation safety inspector for New York international field office overseeing foreign air carriers, holds a sign while attending a news conference at Newark Liberty International Airport, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Newark, N.J. U.S. Sens. Cory Booker and Bob Menendez called a news conference at the airport to address the partial government shutdown, which is keeping some airport employees working without pay. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) ORG XMIT: NJJC101
    Federal Aviation Administration employee Michael Jessie, who is currently working without pay as an aviation safety inspector for New York international field office overseeing foreign air carriers, holds a sign while attending a news conference at Newark Liberty International Airport, Jan. 8, 2019, in Newark, N.J. U.S. Sens. Cory Booker and Bob Menendez called a news conference at the airport to address the partial government shutdown, which is keeping some airport employees working without pay. Julio Cortez, AP>FullscreenJenn Hallam demonstrated against the partial government shutdown on Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) ORG XMIT: PX204
    Jenn Hallam demonstrated against the partial government shutdown on Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Jan. 8, 2019. Matt Rourke, AP>Fullscreenepa07270355 Tourist on bikes stop at the entrance to Fort Point National Historic Site, a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate Bride, a popular tourist site is closed in San Francisco, California, USA, 08 January 2019. A partial shutdown of the US federal government continues since Congress and Trump failed to strike a deal before a 22 December 2018 funding deadline due to differences regarding border security. This shutdown, which has become the second-longest in US history, has affected about 800,000 federal workers. About 380,000 federal workers have been furloughed and an additional 420,000 have been working without knowing when they will next be paid. The National Park Service has said it will take funds from entrance fees to pay for cleaning up overflowing trash, patrolling of parks and other services.  EPA-EFE/JOHN G. MABANGLO ORG XMIT: JGM01
    Tourists on bikes stop at the entrance to Fort Point National Historic Site, a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate Bride, a popular tourist site that is closed in San Francisco on Jan. 8, 2019.  JOHN G. MABANGLO, EPA-EFE>FullscreenPHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 08:  David Fitzpatrick, 64, a Park Ranger, holds an American flag and a placard stating
    David Fitzpatrick, 64, a Park Ranger, holds an American flag and a placard stating "You're fired" with "Smokey the Bear," after a protest rally with furloughed federal workers and area elected officials in front of Independence Hall on Jan. 8, 2019 in Philadelphia. Mark Makela, Getty Images>FullscreenPHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 08:  Tourists photograph the Liberty Bell, unable to go inside due to a lapse in federal appropriations on January 8, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Furloughed federal workers and area elected officials held a protest rally beside it on Independence Mall.  The government shutdown, now lasting 18 days, marks the second longest United States in history, affecting about 800,000 federal employees.  (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775278689 ORIG FILE ID: 1079379568
    Tourists photograph the Liberty Bell, unable to go inside due to a lapse in federal appropriations on Jan. 8, 2019 in Philadelphia. Mark Makela, Getty Images>FullscreenA disappointed young visitor, Asa Hazelwood, 3, pauses at the closed gates to the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019. Asa's mother was unaware of the zoo's closure. The Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo are now closed to visitors during a partial shutdown as Congress and President Trump are at an impasse over funding of Trump's proposed southern border wall.
    A disappointed young visitor, Asa Hazelwood, 3, pauses at the closed gates to the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019. Asa's mother was unaware of the zoo's closure. The Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo are now closed to visitors during a partial shutdown as Congress and President Trump are at an impasse over funding of Trump's proposed southern border wall. ERIK S. LESSER, EPA-EFE>FullscreenEmma James, right, and co-worker Vincent Cuenca demonstrate outside the Federal Center on Goodfellow Boulevard, Jan. 4, 2019 in St. Louis.  James is a processor in the multifamily housing division. Cuenta processes payments to FEMA contractors.
    Emma James, right, and co-worker Vincent Cuenca demonstrate outside the Federal Center on Goodfellow Boulevard, Jan. 4, 2019 in St. Louis. James is a processor in the multifamily housing division. Cuenta processes payments to FEMA contractors. Christian Gooden, St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP>FullscreenA Transportation Security Administration officer works at a checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Jan. 6, 2019, in Miami. The TSA acknowledged an increase in the number of its employees calling off work during the partial government shutdown.
    A Transportation Security Administration officer works at a checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Jan. 6, 2019, in Miami. The TSA acknowledged an increase in the number of its employees calling off work during the partial government shutdown. Lynne Sladky, AP>FullscreenBrandon Torres (center), the Branch Chief of Emergency Services at Grand Canyon National Park, directs guests in the park on Jan. 4, 2019. The park was staffed at minimum capacity due to the government shutdown but retained much of its services due to an executive order issued by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to run the park with state funds in the event of a shutdown.
    Brandon Torres (center), the Branch Chief of Emergency Services at Grand Canyon National Park, directs guests in the park on Jan. 4, 2019. The park was staffed at minimum capacity due to the government shutdown but retained much of its services due to an executive order issued by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to run the park with state funds in the event of a shutdown. Thomas Hawthorne, The Arizona Republic via USA TODAY NETWORK>FullscreenNew brewing equipment, rear, sits idle in a warehouse used by the Alementary Brewing Co. in Hackensack, N.J., Jan. 7, 2019. The owners recently invested in one million dollars worth of new equipment and a new 13,000 sq ft warehouse which would increase their capacity five times, but due to the government shutdown, they have been unable to get the required licenses from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.
    New brewing equipment, rear, sits idle in a warehouse used by the Alementary Brewing Co. in Hackensack, N.J., Jan. 7, 2019. The owners recently invested in one million dollars worth of new equipment and a new 13,000 sq ft warehouse which would increase their capacity five times, but due to the government shutdown, they have been unable to get the required licenses from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. Seth Wenig, AP>FullscreenA guard enters the closed National Archives building in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. A partial US government shutdown began at midnight, Dec. 22, when a funding agreement between Congress and President Trump could not be reached.
    A guard enters the closed National Archives building in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. A partial US government shutdown began at midnight, Dec. 22, when a funding agreement between Congress and President Trump could not be reached. ERIK S. LESSER, EPA-EFE>FullscreenBarricades block a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, Calif. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown.
    Barricades block a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, Calif. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Mario Tama, Getty Images>FullscreenVolunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen walk after cleaning a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown.
    Volunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen walk after cleaning a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Mario Tama, Getty Images>FullscreenKunyanatt Chalothorn from Thailand takes a selfie with a closure sign at the entrance to the Smithsonian American Indian Museum in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019.
    Kunyanatt Chalothorn from Thailand takes a selfie with a closure sign at the entrance to the Smithsonian American Indian Museum in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019. ERIK S. LESSER, EPA-EFE>FullscreenPeople watch as the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island ferry transports passengers on Jan. 5, 2019, in New York, as the government shutdown enters its third week. New York state funds are being used to keep the attractions open during the shutdown which has affected National Parks.
    People watch as the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island ferry transports passengers on Jan. 5, 2019, in New York, as the government shutdown enters its third week. New York state funds are being used to keep the attractions open during the shutdown which has affected National Parks. DON EMMERT, AFP/Getty Images>FullscreenNora Brooks a furloughed customer service representative for the Internal Revenue Service poses for a photograph at her home in Philadelphia, Jan. 3, 2019.   Brooks has been furloughed, worrying about whether she will need to seek a second job. The agency requires pre-approval to avoid conflicts of interest, but there's no one in the office to sign off.
    Nora Brooks a furloughed customer service representative for the Internal Revenue Service poses for a photograph at her home in Philadelphia, Jan. 3, 2019. Brooks has been furloughed, worrying about whether she will need to seek a second job. The agency requires pre-approval to avoid conflicts of interest, but there's no one in the office to sign off. Matt Rourke, AP>FullscreenA donation box sits on the counter as Dany Garcia speaks with visitors at the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center in Everglades National Park, Jan. 4, 2019, in Homestead, Fla. Garcia is being paid by the Florida National Parks Association to work in the center during the partial government shutdown. As the shutdown drags on, private organizations, local businesses, volunteers and state governments are putting up the money and manpower to keep national parks across the U.S. open, safe and clean for visitors.
    A donation box sits on the counter as Dany Garcia speaks with visitors at the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center in Everglades National Park, Jan. 4, 2019, in Homestead, Fla. Garcia is being paid by the Florida National Parks Association to work in the center during the partial government shutdown. As the shutdown drags on, private organizations, local businesses, volunteers and state governments are putting up the money and manpower to keep national parks across the U.S. open, safe and clean for visitors. Lynne Sladky, AP>FullscreenFederal contractor Chris Erickson paints his bathroom, Jan., 4, 2019, in North Salt Lake, Utah. Erickson says he'll run out of vacation days if the shutdown continues. The father of three from Salt Lake City will then crack into his savings, and he'll likely postpone a 14th wedding anniversary trip with his wife to a cabin. Erickson said he likely won't get the chance for reimbursement for the lost days because he's a contractor.
    Federal contractor Chris Erickson paints his bathroom, Jan., 4, 2019, in North Salt Lake, Utah. Erickson says he'll run out of vacation days if the shutdown continues. The father of three from Salt Lake City will then crack into his savings, and he'll likely postpone a 14th wedding anniversary trip with his wife to a cabin. Erickson said he likely won't get the chance for reimbursement for the lost days because he's a contractor. Rick Bowmer, AP>FullscreenWorkmen from the commercial cleanup company 1-800-GOT-JUNK clean up trash on The Ellipse, south of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. The company donated resources to clean up the area.
    Workmen from the commercial cleanup company 1-800-GOT-JUNK clean up trash on The Ellipse, south of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. The company donated resources to clean up the area. SHAWN THEW, EPA-EFE>FullscreenIn this Nov. 21, 2018, file photo, Justin Roth holds a handful of soybeans at the Brooklyn Elevator in Brooklyn, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it must delay the release of key crop reports due to the partial government shutdown. The announcement on Jan. 4, 2019 left investors and farmers without vital information during an already tumultuous time for agricultural markets. The USDA planned to release the reports Jan. 11 but said that even if the shutdown ended immediately, the agency wouldn't have time to release the reports as scheduled.
    In this Nov. 21, 2018, file photo, Justin Roth holds a handful of soybeans at the Brooklyn Elevator in Brooklyn, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it must delay the release of key crop reports due to the partial government shutdown. The announcement on Jan. 4, 2019 left investors and farmers without vital information during an already tumultuous time for agricultural markets. The USDA planned to release the reports Jan. 11 but said that even if the shutdown ended immediately, the agency wouldn't have time to release the reports as scheduled. Charlie Neibergall, AP>FullscreenVisitors to Great Smoky Mountain National Park drive through the park on Jan. 5, 2019.
    Visitors to Great Smoky Mountain National Park drive through the park on Jan. 5, 2019. Robert Berlin, The Daily Times via AP>FullscreenCorrectional Officer Joseph Pellicano who is employed at United States Penitentiary at Canaan has been on staff for 12 and half years and will be working without pay until the government shutdown ends in Jessup, Pa., on Jan. 4, 2019.
    Correctional Officer Joseph Pellicano who is employed at United States Penitentiary at Canaan has been on staff for 12 and half years and will be working without pay until the government shutdown ends in Jessup, Pa., on Jan. 4, 2019. Jake Danna Stevens, The Times-Tribune via AP>FullscreenTwo surfers walk past an open garbage bin and piles of trash at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Jan. 3, 2019.
    Two surfers walk past an open garbage bin and piles of trash at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Jan. 3, 2019. Jeff Chiu, AP>FullscreenRebecca Maclean, a housing program specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Pittsburgh, sits outside her home in Pittsburgh, Jan. 3, 2019. Maclean, 41, has been on furlough since Dec. 21.  Her family's financial outlook isn't dire yet since her husband, Dan Thompson, owns a knife-making business and works as an elected constable. But the couple recently sat down to prioritize which bills must be paid on time and which can be paid late without dinging their credit history.
    Rebecca Maclean, a housing program specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Pittsburgh, sits outside her home in Pittsburgh, Jan. 3, 2019. Maclean, 41, has been on furlough since Dec. 21. Her family's financial outlook isn't dire yet since her husband, Dan Thompson, owns a knife-making business and works as an elected constable. But the couple recently sat down to prioritize which bills must be paid on time and which can be paid late without dinging their credit history. Gene J. Puskar, AP>FullscreenVisitors walk past the Wall of Names at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pa. on Jan. 2, 2019. Signs were posted on all doors stating that the facilities were closed because of the government shutdown, but that the grounds are open from sunrise to sunset.
    Visitors walk past the Wall of Names at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pa. on Jan. 2, 2019. Signs were posted on all doors stating that the facilities were closed because of the government shutdown, but that the grounds are open from sunrise to sunset. Darrell Sapp, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP>FullscreenTrash lays on the grounds of the National Mall during the partial shutdown of the U.S. government on Jan. 2, 2019.
    Trash lays on the grounds of the National Mall during the partial shutdown of the U.S. government on Jan. 2, 2019. Mark Wilson, Getty Images>FullscreenMike Gayzagian, a 49-year-old Transportation Security Administration officer at Boston's Logan International Airport, speaks with a reporter from The Associated Press at his home in Watertown, Mass on Jan. 3, 2019. Gayzagian, who has worked for the TSA more than a decade, got his last pre-shutdown paycheck last week, and he continues to report to work, as all TSA officers have since the government closed.  The 49-year-old said worrying about finances has made it difficult to concentrate on the work of keeping airports safe.
    Mike Gayzagian, a 49-year-old Transportation Security Administration officer at Boston's Logan International Airport, speaks with a reporter from The Associated Press at his home in Watertown, Mass on Jan. 3, 2019. Gayzagian, who has worked for the TSA more than a decade, got his last pre-shutdown paycheck last week, and he continues to report to work, as all TSA officers have since the government closed. The 49-year-old said worrying about finances has made it difficult to concentrate on the work of keeping airports safe. Steven Senne, AP>FullscreenA stop sign is seen near the White House during a government shutdown in Washington on Dec. 27, 2018.
    A stop sign is seen near the White House during a government shutdown in Washington on Dec. 27, 2018. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS, AFP/Getty Images>Fullscreen

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      He also played down the scope of his plan, saying his wall would not be built coast-to-coast, and could just as easily be steel slat fencing.

      State of the State of the Union? 

      The president's State of the Union address was postponed due to the government shutdown. Now that the government is reopening, is his address back on the table?

      House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said not so fast. 

      "The state of the union is not planned now," she told reporters after Trump's announcement that the government would reopen.

      "What I said to the president is when the government is opened we will discuss a mutually agreeable date," Pelosi said, adding "I'll look forward to doing that" and welcoming Trump in the House chambers when that is done.  

      Trump decided to postpone his address on Wednesday after a bitter back-and-forth with Pelosi. 

      Trump explained that the House Chamber was the only appropriate place for the address, abandoning the search for an "alternative" location that he teased to reporters.

      "As the Shutdown was going on, Nancy Pelosi asked me to give the State of the Union Address. I agreed. She then changed her mind because of the Shutdown, suggesting a later date. This is her prerogative - I will do the Address when the Shutdown is over," Trump said. 

      The announcement came after Pelosi wrote a letter, telling Trump that the House would not allow the president to hold the address in the House chamber, where it's traditionally held.

      Trump had lashed out at Pelosi after reading her letter, telling reporters "the State of the Union speech has been canceled by Nancy Pelosi because she doesn’t want to hear the truth. She doesn't want the American public to hear what's going on."

      CLOSE

      Hours after President Donald Trump said he would postpone this year's State of the Union address, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she's glad the issue is "off the table" and leaders can shift focus back to reopening the government. (Jan. 24) AP

      What happens next? 

      It's been more than a month since the shutdown started.

      And over those 35 days, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have tried to come to a deal that would both appease Democrats, Republicans and the president. 

      That hasn't happened.

      Now, lawmakers will have 21 days to negotiate a deal. If that doesn't happen, it's unclear exactly what might come next. 

      But, both Republicans and Democrats expressed optimism on Friday that a deal could be possible. 

      Top Democrats House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said there were areas on border security where both Democrats and Republicans agreed, saying that was a sign a bipartisan compromise could be negotiated. 

      "I'm optimistic," Pelosi said. "I see every challenge or every crisis as an opportunity to do the right thing for the American people."

      Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said he was also “somewhat optimistic” about a potential deal, telling Fox News that Democrats should take up the president’s offer for temporary protections for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which includes a group known as DREAMers, and Temporary Protected Status (TPS) holders.   

      "To my Democratic colleagues, this is the best chance that I’ve seen since 2006 to get a deal that is a win-win for all of us," Graham said. "Take advantage of it. If you don’t by Feb. 15, this president has one choice left: to do it by himself by executive action. That’s the last option but it might be the only option if Democrats won’t work with us."

      Executive action still on the table

      If there isn't a deal, as Graham noted, the president could elect to use his executive powers to redirect money for a barrier along the southern border.

      The president has threatened for weeks to declare a national emergency to redirect money to free up the $5.7 billion he wants for constructing a border wall. The move would curtail Congress, which under the Constitution directs appropriating funding to federal agencies.

      CLOSE

      President Donald Trump renewed his call for a border wall threatened another government shutdown or emergency action if he does not get 'fair deal.' (Jan. 25) AP

      Trump using his presidential powers to clean up shutdown worries would likely lead to another mess as liberals have already threatened to sue if Trump takes such action. 

      In his remarks on Friday, Trump hinted that executive action is still on the table if a deal isn't made. 

      "As everyone knows, I have a very powerful alternative, but I didn't want to use it at this time," Trump said. "Hopefully it will be unnecessary."

      Contributing: David Jackson, Michael Collins, John Fritze and Eliza Collins

      Source : https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/25/government-shutdown-president-trump-anounces-deal-what-to-know/2680685002/

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